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Tuesday, February 19, 2008




USA Flag



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The United States of America is a federal constitutional republic comprising fifty states and a federal district.And also possesses several territories, or insular areas, that are scattered around the Caribbean and Pacific.
The term America, for the lands of the western hemisphere, was coined in the early sixteenth century after Amerigo Vespucci, an Italian explorer and cartographer. The full name of the country was first used officially in the Declaration of Independence, which was the "unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America" adopted by the "Representatives of the united States of America" on July 4, 1776.[10] The current name was finalized on November 15, 1777, when the Second Continental Congress adopted the Articles of Confederation, the first of which states, "The Stile of this Confederacy shall be 'The United States of America.'" Common abbreviations of the United States of America include the United States, the U.S., and the U.S.A. Colloquial names for the country include America and the States.
The flag of the United States of America consists of 13 equal horizontal stripes of red (top and bottom) alternating with white, with a blue rectangle in the canton bearing 50 small, white, five-pointed stars arranged in nine offset horizontal rows of six stars (top and bottom) alternating with rows of five stars. The creator of the U.S. Flag is popularly considered to be Betsy Ross. The 50 stars on the flag represent the 50 U.S. states and the 13 stripes represent the original Thirteen Colonies that rebelled against the British crown and became the first states in the Union.[1] Nicknames for the flag include the Stars and Stripes, Old Glory,[2] and the Star-Spangled Banner (also the name of the country's official national anthem).

Because of its symbolism, the starred blue canton is called the "union". This part of the national flag can stand alone as a maritime flag called the Union Jack[3] which served as the U.S. jack on warships from 1777 until 2002. It continues to be used as a jack by various federally-owned vessels, including those of the Coast Guard, Military Sealift Command, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.


Capital: Washington, D.C.


Largest City: New York City


National languages: English


Independence from Great Britain

- Declared July 4, 1776

- Recognized September 3, 1783


Anthem: "The Star-Spangled Banner"


Bird: Bald eagle


Motto: In God We Trust




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by: Flags Mart
Monday, February 18, 2008




Canada Yukon Flag



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Yukon is the westernmost of Canada's three territories. It was named after the Yukon River, Yukon meaning "Great River" in Gwich’in.

The flag of Yukon, Canada, is a green, white, and blue tricolour with the Coat of Arms of Yukon at the centre above a wreath of fireweed, the territorial flower. An official flag for Yukon was created during the 1960s, a decade where the National Flag of Canada was chosen as well as several other provincial flags were created. The Flag of Yukon was officially selected from a territory-wide design competition in 1967, with the winning design adopted on March 1, 1968.


Capital: Whitehorse


Largest City: Whitehorse


Official languages: English, French


Flower: Fireweed


Bird: Common Raven


Tree: Subalpine Fir




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by: Flags Mart




Canada Nunavut Flag



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Nunavut is the largest and newest territory of Canada; it was separated officially from the Northwest Territories on April 1, 1999 via the Nunavut Act and the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement Act, though the actual boundaries were established in 1993.

The Flag of Nunavut was proclaimed on 1 April 1999, along with the territory of Nunavut in Canada.

It features a red inukshuk—an Inuit land marker—and a blue star, which represents both the Niqirtsuituq, the North Star, and the leadership of elders in the community. The colours represent the riches of the land, sea and sky.




Capital: Iqaluit



Largest City: Iqaluit



Official languages: Inuktitut, Inuinnaqtun, English, French



Flower: Purple Saxifrage



Bird: Rock Ptarmigan



Motto: Nunavut Sannginivut ( "Our land, our strength")




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by: Flags Mart
Sunday, February 17, 2008




National Mexico Flag



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The Flag of the United Mexican States or Mexico is a vertical tricolor of green, white, and red with the national coat of arms charged in the center of the white stripe. While the meaning of the colors has changed over time, these three colors were adopted by Mexico following independence from Spain during the country's War of Independence. The current flag was adopted in 1968, but the overall design has been used since 1821 when the First National Flag was created. The current law of national symbols, Law on the National Arms, Flag, and Anthem, that governs the use of the national flag has been in place since 1984.
Originally, the colors had the following meanings:

Green: Independencia (independence from Spain)
White: Religión (religion, the Roman Catholic faith)
Red: Unión (union between the Europeans and Americans)

However, the meaning of the colors changed because of the secularization of the country, which was spearheaded by President Benito Juárez.The new color meanings are as follows:

Green: Hope
White: Unity
Red: Blood of the national heroes



Capital: Mexico City



Largest City: Mexico City



National languages: Spanish



Independence from Spain

- Declared September 16, 1810

- Recognized September 27, 1821


Anthem: Himno Nacional Mexicano



Origin of the Name: The origin of the name of the Mexica is obscure and subject to diverse interpretations. Some argue that it derives from the Nahuatl Mexitl or Mexitli, a secret name for the god of war and patron of the Aztecs, Huitzilopochtli, in which case Mexico means "Place where Mexitli lives". Another hypothesis is that the word Mexiko derives from the metztli ("moon"), xictli ("navel", "center" or "son"), and the suffix -co (place), in which case it means "Place at the center of the moon" or "Place at the center of the Lake Moon", in reference to Lake Texcoco. The system of interconnected lakes, of which Texcoco was at the center, had the form of a rabbit, the same image that the Aztecs saw in the moon. Tenochtitlan was located at the center (or navel) of the lake (or rabbit/moon). Still another hypothesis suggests that it is derived from Mectli, the goddess of maguey.



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National Canada Flag



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The National Flag of Canada, popularly known as the Maple Leaf and l'Unifolié (French for "the one-leafed") , is a base red flag with a white square in its centre featuring a stylized, 11-pointed, red maple leaf. Before this flag, Canada used variants of the British Red Ensign with the shield of Canada charged in the fly. The Red Ensign that took familiar shape in Canada was introduced by Prime Minister Mackenzie King after the First World War. From the 1940s until 1965, Canada made several attempts to create its own flag by holding national contests, but the Red Ensign still flew for Canada. A serious debate about a flag change did not occur until 1964, when a committee was picked by Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson. Out of three choices, the maple leaf design by George F.G. Stanley was chosen as the winner. The flag made its first appearance on February 15, 1965, which is now celebrated annually as Flag Day.


Capital: Ottawa


Largest City: Toronto


Official languages: English, French


Status: world's second largest country by total area


Anthem: "O Canada"


Motto: A Mari Usque Ad Mare (Latin) "From Sea to Sea"


Origin of the Name: The name Canada comes from a St. Lawrence Iroquoian word kanata, meaning "village" or "settlement." In 1535, inhabitants of the present-day Quebec City region used the word to direct explorer Jacques Cartier toward the village of Stadacona. Cartier used the word 'Canada' to refer to not only that village, but the entire area subject to Donnacona, Chief at Stadacona. By 1545, European books and maps began referring to this region as Canada.



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by: Flags Mart
Thursday, February 14, 2008




Pow-Mia Standard Flag



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Only one flag besides the Stars and Stripes that represents the United States has ever flown over the White House in Washington, DC. Only one flag is ever displayed in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda. That flag is not one that represents an individual state, branch of service, or other select group. It is the POW/MIA (Prisoners of War/Missing In Action) Flag that calls to mind the sacrifice and plight of those Americans who have sacrificed their own freedom, to preserve liberty for all of us. It's presence serves to remind us that, while we enjoy the privileges of freedom, somewhere there are soldiers who have not been accounted for and may, in fact, be held against their will by the enemies of Freedom.

The POW/MIA flag is an american flag designed as a symbol of the citizens concern about the United States military personel taken as prisoners of war and missing in action. The POW/MIA flag was created by the National League of Families and officially recognized by the United States Congress "as the symbol of our Nation's concern and commitment to resolving as fully as possible the fates of Americans still prisoner, missing and unaccounted for in Southeast Asia, thus ending the uncertainty for their families and the Nation."

On March 9, 1989, an official League flag, which flew over the White House on 1988 National POW/MIA Recognition Day, was installed in the U.S. Capitol rotunda as a result of legislation passed by the 100th Congress.


Congress has set aside the THIRD FRIDAY of September in each year as National POW/MIA Recognition Day. It is a time to remember those who never came home. Congress has further recognized the POW/MIA flag of the National League of Families as the official flag to represent our missing soldiers.



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by: Flags Mart



Rebel Confederate States of America Flag



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The Confederate States of America (also called the Confederacy, the Confederate States, and CSA) was the name of the former government formed by eleven southern states of the United States of America between 1861 and 1865. However, since the CSA was never recognized by other countries, by international law and custom, it was never properly an independent country.



Seven states declared their independence from the United States before Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated as President; four more did so after the Civil War began at the Battle of Fort Sumter. The United States of America ("The Union") held secession illegal and refused recognition of the Confederacy. Although British and French commercial interests sold it warships and materials, no European nation officially recognized the CSA.


The CSA effectively collapsed when Robert E. Lee and Joseph Johnston surrendered their armies in April of 1865. The last meeting of its Cabinet took place in Georgia in May. Nearly all remaining Confederate forces surrendered by the end of June. A decade-long process known as Reconstruction temporarily gave civil rights and the right to vote to the freedmen, expelled ex-Confederate leaders from office, and re-admitted the states to representation in Congress.


The Confederate States of America used several flags during its existence from 1861 to 1865. Since the end of the American Civil War, personal and official use of Confederate flags, and of flags derived from these, has continued under considerable controversy. Currently the state flags of Mississippi and Georgia draw heavily upon Confederate flag designs, and those of Arkansas, Alabama, Florida and Tennessee arguably incorporate certain elements from these designs.


What is now often called "The Confederate Flag" or "The Confederate Battle Flag" (actually a combination of the Battle Flag's colors with the Second Navy Jack's design), despite its never having historically represented the CSA as a nation, has become a widely recognized symbol of the South. It is also called the "rebel" or "Dixie" flag, and is often incorrectly referred to as the "Stars and Bars" (the actual "Stars and Bars" is the First National Flag, which used an entirely different design).


The use of the flag by soldiers came under investigation after some African-American soldiers filed complaints. By the end of World War II, the use of the Confederate flag in the military was rare.[20] However, the Confederate flag continues to be flown in an unofficial manner by many Southern soldiers, who make up a plurality of the United States Armed Forces. It was seen many times in Korea, Vietnam, and in the Middle East.


Soon after his inauguration as provisional president on February 18, 1861, Davis appointed his first cabinet; each of the six members represented a different state. The first task of the administration was to prepare for the impending conflict. Between December 30, 1860, and February 18, 1861, the Confederates had seized 11 federal forts and arsenals from South Carolina to Texas and harassed Fort Sumter in Charleston, South Carolina. Lincoln, in his inaugural address on March 4, 1861, rejected the right of secession but attempted to conciliate the South. Negotiations for the relief of Fort Sumter failed, and on April 12 the bombardment of the fort began. Three days later Lincoln announced that an insurrection had occurred, and he called for volunteers.


The number of states in the Confederacy was increased to 11 by the secession of Virginia in April and of Arkansas and North Carolina in May, followed by Tennessee in June. The provisional Confederate Congress, which had met for four sessions between February 4, 1861 and February 17, 1862, was replaced by a permanent legislature on February 18, 1862. The Confederate capital was moved on May 24, 1861 from Montgomery to Richmond, Virginia. At the first general elections held under the permanent constitution on November 6, 1861, Davis was elected president and Stephens vice president. In February 1862, Davis was inaugurated president for a term of 6 years. The last years of his service were marked by the conflict between the civil and military forces and gave rise to the assertion that the government of the Confederacy had become a military dictatorship. The tendency toward dictatorship was increased by the custom of holding secret sessions of the Congress, by the practice of cabinet officers exercising their rights to sit in Congress, and by the gradual lowering of the political morale and independence of Congress. This condition was further complicated by personal controversies among officials. The first permanent Congress held four sessions; the second Congress, two sessions, with the final adjournment of the body taking place on March 18, 1865.

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Tuesday, February 12, 2008




Crimson Pirate Flag



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The Crimson Pirate is a 1952 film directed by Robert Siodmak. The color film stars Burt Lancaster as "The Crimson Pirate" Capt. Vallo. The film centers on Vallo and his equally acrobatic side kick Ojo (Nick Cravat). Ojo is mute in the film because Cravat had a thick East Coast accent. This mean pirate skull is so tough he has a knife in his mouth.

Captain Vallo (Burt Lancaster), a pirate known as 'The Crimson Pirate', and his crew capture a ship of the King's navy. The ship is carrying Baron Gruda (Leslie Bradley), the special envoy to the King, who is on his way to the Island of Cobra to help crush a rebellion by rebels opposed to the King's rule. Vallo proposes to make money by selling the weapons on the ship to El Libre, the leader of the rebels. Baron Gruda then proposes to pay Vallo money if he can capture El Libre and bring him to him. Vallo accepts and Baron Gruda and his crew are released, Vallo keeping their ship and releasing Gruda and his men onto his own. While some of the pirates complain that this is not pirate business, they soon come around when they find out the amount of money to be made.
Vallo and his crew sail to Cobra, where Vallo and his lieutenant Ojo (Nick Cravat) go ashore to meet the rebels. They eventually meet the rebels who are led by Pablo Murphy (Noel Purcell) and Consuelo (Eva Bartok), where they learn that El Libre has been captured and is in a military prison on the island of San Pero. The meeting is interrupted when they are discovered by the King's guards. Consuelo leads Vallo and Ojo to safety, then they all go to the ship. Vallo tells the crew he will rescue El Libre, though Consuelo only believes Vallo is interested in selling weapons to him. She promises him he will get the money. Consuelo also tells Vallo El Libre is her father.

They sail to San Pero. Vallo, dressing in the clothes left on board the ship, pretends to be Baron Gruda and goes to a dinner held in honour of Gruda by the Colonel of the garrison (Frank Pettingell). The Colonel shows Vallo El Libre (Frederick Leister) and another captured rebel, Professor Elihu Prudence (James Hayter). Vallo orders the prisoners to be released into his custody and leaves with them. They all go to the ship which then leaves for Cobra.

Consuelo is grateful to Vallo for rescueing her father but is distraught to find out that Vallo intens to sell her, El Libre and the Professor to Baron Gruda. Ojo suggests to Vallo that he is in love with Consuelo. Vallo denies this but decides to release them instead of selling them to Gruda. Consuelo begs Vallo to come with them but he refuses. Unknown to Vallo, his first mate, Humble Bellows (Torin Thatcher), overhears them. Bellows plots against Vallo, sending one of the pirates ashore with a message for Gruda.

Vallo lets El Libre and Consuelo go first, but the King's guards are waiting. El Libre is killed and Consuelo is captured. The pirates mutiny and Humble Bellows is elected Captain. Baron Gruda promises Bellows money for dealing with Vallo. Vallo, Ojo and the Professor are cast adrift in a boat to die. Gruda proposes a toast, giving the pirates a barrel of rum. Unknown to the pirates, the rum is drugged and when they fall asleep, they are captured, transferred back to Vallo's ship and held prisoners for Gruda to sell them to the King.

Baron Gruda tells Consuelo that she will marry Herman (Eliot Makeham), the Governor of Cobra or he will kill the people of Cobra. Consuelo agrees, Gruda then announcing the date of the wedding and forcing the people to attend. Meanwhile, Vallo, Ojo and the Professor manage to escape back to Cobra where they find out about the wedding. Vallo intends to rescue Consuelo but the Professor tells him he needs the help of the people. Vallo agrees, and along with the Professor builds weapons and trains the people how to use them. They make nitroglycerin bombs, tanks, flamethrowers and a hot air balloon.

On the day of the wedding, the people revolt before the ceremony and overthrow the guards. Baron Gruda manages to escape to his ship, taking Consuelo with him. Vallo and Ojo go after them, taking the hot air balloon. They spot their ship, climb down to it and release the pirates. They then go after Gruda's ship. When they get close to the ship, Vallo orders the pirates below deck, making Gruda think they are about to launch a broadside. They sneak out the back of the ship, and swim underwater to Gruda's ship. Gruda launches a broadside against Vallo's ship, destroying it. Vallo and the pirates then board Gruda's ship and fight with Gruda and his guards. The guards are defeated and Gruda is killed. Vallo and Consuelo embrace.

Red as blood, the crimson pirate flag wards off any attacker.




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Pirate Jack Rackham Flag



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John Rackam, also known as Calico Jack because of his clothing preferences, was only a moderately successful pirate who is mainly remembered for his association with two women pirates. Rather than attacking plump rich targets, Rackam preferred using a small sloop to attack local merchants and fishing vessels.

In 1718, Rackam served as quartermaster on Charles Vane's pirate ship. On November 23, Vane's ship encountered a French man-of-war in the Windward Passage and he decided to retreat from the battle rather than try to board the warship. Many of the crew felt differently on this matter, including Rackam. The next day, Rackam and crew confronted Vane and stated he was a coward. The crew elected Calico Jack as the new captain and Vane and his fellow supporters were set off on a small sloop. And within the day, Calico Jack was able to plunder several small vessels and continued to plunder more around Jamaica. One vessel taken had a Jamaican tavernkeeper, Hosea Tisdale, onboard that Rackam and the crew were acquinted with and after plundering the vessel, he released the captive crew and made sure the tavernkeeper had a safe voyage home.

In May 1719 Rackam sailed to the Bahamas for a pardon and settled down there soon after. While in a local tavern he met Anne Bonny whom he soon started to court. When she became pregnant he took her to some friends he had in Cuba to take care of her during her preganancy. Once their money began to run out, Rackam returned to piracy and convinced Bonny to come with him, which she did, only disguised as a man. He again went back to plundering his standard small local merchants in the West Indies. On one of the vessels was Mary Read who would also join Rackam's crew without anyone knowing (yet) her true sexuality.

On August 20, 1720 Rackam and eleven others stole the anchored sloop William in Nassau harbor during the night. Governor Woodes Rogers learnt of this and soon issued a proclamation stating who was responsible for the piracy. In addtion to this, he sent two sloops with 45 men out to find Rackam. At this time, Calico Jack was attacking fishing vessels in Jamaica and continued to plunder small vessels for about the next month along the West Indies.

Captain Jonathan Barret's privateer sloop caught up with Calico Jack's stolen William anchored near Nigril Bay in early October. Rackam immediately set sail to escape the well-armed sloop but at about ten o'clock at night Barret caught up to Rackam. Barret ordered him to surrender and in response Rackam and his crew sent him a shot from a swivel gun along with a few words. The nighttime duel did not last too long though, soon Barret's sloop had damaged William's boom and effectively knocked her out of commision. When Barret's crew boarded William, only Anne Bonny and Mary Read defended the attackers while the rest of the pirates, including Rackam, simply surrendered without a fight.

On November 16, 1720, Rackam and 11 of his male crewmen were convicted and sentenced to death in St. Jago de la Vega, Jamaica (the two women were tried later.) Rackam was able to see his lover Anne Bonny once before his execution and she stated to him "that she was sorry to see him there, but if he had fought like a man, he need not have been hanged like a dog." On November 19-20, Rackam and his crewmen were hanged and their bodies were placed in chains and hung at various locations on the islands as a deterant and message to fellow pirates. Rackam's was hung on an island near Port Royal called Deadman's Cay, now fittingly named Rackam's Cay. Thus ended the life of the pirate Calico Jack. While he only plundered mainly local small vessels in the Caribbean, he is unique in having had not one, but two, women pirates disguised as men in his crew.



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by: Flags Mart
Friday, February 1, 2008




Pirate Brethren of the Coast Flag



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The Brethren of the Coast were a loose coalition of pirates and privateers commonly known as buccaneers and active in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries in the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico.

They were a syndicate of captains with letters of marque and reprisal who regulated their privateering enterprises within the community of privateers and with their outside benefactors. They were primarily private individual merchant mariners of Protestant background usually of English and French origin.

During their heyday when the Thirty Years War was devastating the Protestant communities of France, Germany, and the Netherlands and England was engaged in various conflicts, the privateers of these nationalities were issued letters of marque to raid Catholic French and Spanish shipping and territories.

Based primarily on the island of Tortuga off the coast of Haiti and the city of Port Royal on the island of Jamaica. The original Brethren were mostly French Huguenot and British Protestants, but their ranks were joined by other adventurers of various nationalities including, Spaniards, and even African sailors, as well as escaped slaves and outlaws of various sovereigns.

In keeping with their Protestant and mostly Common Law heritage the Brethren were governed by codes of conduct that favored legislative decision-making, hierarchical command authority, individual rights, and equitable division of revenues.

Henry Morgan is perhaps the most famous member of the Brethren and the one usually noted with codifying it's organization. However, following the demographic changes which featured the rise of slave labor in the Caribbean islands, most maritime families moved to the mainland colonies of the future United States or to their home countries. A few, unable to compete effectively with slave labor, enamored of easy riches, or out of angst continued to maintain the Brethren of the Coasts as a purely criminal organization which preyed upon all civilian maritime shipping. This second era of the Brethren began the start of the age of piracy and brigandage which featured the Caribbean until socioeconomic and military changes of the late 18th and early 19th century finally broke its back.



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Pirate Black Beard Lives Flag



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Edward Teach (c. 1680 – November 22, 1718), better known as Blackbeard, was a notorious English pirate in the Caribbean Sea and western Atlantic during the early 18th century, a period referred to as the Golden Age of Piracy. His best known vessel was the Queen Anne's Revenge, which is believed to have run aground near Beaufort Inlet, North Carolina in 1718.

Blackbeard often fought, or simply showed himself, wearing a big feathered tricorn, and having multiple swords, knives, and pistols at his disposal. It was reported in the General History of the Pirates that he had hemp and lit matches woven into his enormous black beard during battle. Blackbeard is the premier image of the seafaring pirate.



Nickname: Blackbeard



Type: Pirate



Place of birth: Bristol, England



Place of death: Ocracoke, North Carolina



Years of service: 1712 – 1718



Rank: Captain



Base of Operations: Atlantic




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